Archive for February, 2018

Looking at this blog’s WordPress stats yesterday I saw I had some views from Norway.  I wonder if that is my old correspondent S, who a few years ago was assiduously researching her family history, which overlapped with Binda Billsborough and the Days of Fontwell.

I’ve been making a few attempts to probe the gap between Binda’s pre-WW1 childhood in the East End and her emergence as a film star’s secretary in the 1930s. I tried looking at secretarial training colleges in central London, but there are so many listed in directories at the time and there are no records as far as I can tell.  There’s another possible person connected with Binda that I wanted to investigate, but when I went to my local library to use ancestry.com for free I found that thanks to their new computer system it wasn’t available and they didn’t know when it would be rectified.  I hope this is nothing to do with Carillion.

I went back to Chippenham the other day to take another look at a plan of Salisbury racecourse that I’d drawn a rough sketch of on my first visit there. Now it was desirable to get some photos of it to see if it threw any light on the great reinforced concrete stand conundrum.  I also had the joy of looking through some old City Council accounts.  This was in order to look for references to the City Bowl, a race that the local authority has supported since the 17th century.

A further close-up look at 1900s photos with a grandstand semi-obscured in the background still encourages me to think it’s the current Tatts stand. It’s frustrating that we can find no written evidence to verify it.


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Kentish Town races

The remnant of the Kentish Town racecourse mentioned last time consists of a short piece of footpath next to a pub called The Vine, which used to be the focus of races held in the fields behind it. The path goes between two brick walls – and with a brick extension from the pub or the building on the other side overhead. Then there is another old brick wall facing you when reaching a T-junction of paths. The fields are long gone, by turning left onto College Lane I soon found a housing development promoted, aptly, by The Furlong Collection. A four bedroom house in this quiet enclave was on the market for £1.6m in 2016.

There are any number of “Racecourse Roads” and “Racecourse Avenues” up and down the country commemorating former courses. It’d be interesting to see how many, though collecting all their details would be a dry and arguably pointless exercise. Pubs named after racehorses is another task for the anorak, and it’s becoming easier as more and more close. Or pubs with racing-related names; one I came across in connection with Salisbury research was the Blagrave Arms in Reading. Its connection with the wealthy family of that name has long gone.

I’ve just returned from a few days in Uttoxeter. Even though the weather forecast was unpromising there was a good crowd at the races. The restaurant, as far as I could tell pressing my nose against the glass from outside, looked very busy if not full. They’ve gone from having a couple of big days, the Midlands National and the Summer Plate, to having half a dozen or more. I gather there is still a steady trickle of book sales, so it won’t be going on Amazon for a while.

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